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The vast array of chemicals in our household products have been under study in recent years to determine the impact on our health. Below are links to just a few articles containing useful information about chemical based household products and your family's health.

 

 

Narcotic and Quasi-narcotic pain relieving drugs.

Vicodin has proven effective in reducing or eliminating pain and is as potent as codeine but not as strong as morphine, however, as is the case with many drugs there are side effects. Constant use or use of high doses of Vicotin can lead to abuse and dependency.

The Environmental Illness Resource

Household cleaning sprays linked to asthma

 

 

 

News - Allergy News

 

Written by Matthew Hogg   

Monday, 15 October 2007

 

A new study shows that chemical sprays used for cleaning in the majority of homes may cause up to 15% of new cases of asthma in adults.

 

Most people are now aware of a link between urban air pollution and allergic respiratory conditions such as asthma, but new research suggesting domestic cleaning products are also a major trigger may surprise many.

 

The study, which is published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, suggests that the use of cleaning sprays and air fresheners may account for up to one in seven, or 15%, of new asthma cases in adults. The study found no link between asthma and domestic cleaning products that are not sprayed.

 

The conclusions of the study are based on a review of data from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey, one of the largest epidemiologic studies of respiratory disease in the world.  {See following link for the remainder of the article: http://www.ei-resource.org/news/allergy-news/household-cleaning-sprays-linked-to-asthma/

 

CBC News

Household cleaning sprays linked to higher asthma risk

Study says 1 in 7 adult asthma cases could be attributed to cleaning and deodorizing sprays

Last Updated: Friday, October 12, 2007 | 3:47 PM ET

Love spritzing down the house with those scented deodorizing sprays? You may be putting your lungs  and the lungs of others around you  at risk, according to a new study.

Using household cleaning sprays and scented air fresheners as little as once a week can raise a person's risk of developing asthma, the European study says.

The risk of developing asthma increased with frequency of cleaning and number of different sprays used, but on average was about 30 to 50 per cent higher in people regularly exposed to cleaning sprays than in others.The risk of developing asthma increased with frequency of cleaning and number of different sprays used, but on average was about 30 to 50 per cent higher in people regularly exposed to cleaning sprays than in others.
(CBC)

"Frequent use of household cleaning sprays may be an important risk factor for adult asthma," said lead author Jan-Paul Zock of the Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology at the Municipal Institute of Medical Research in Barcelona, Spain, in a release.

Fifteen per cent, or one in seven, adult asthma cases could be attributed to use of cleaning and deodorizing sprays, according to the study.

The research is published in the second issue for October of the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

The study included more than 3,500 subjects across 22 centres in 10 European countries. Participants were assessed for current asthma, current wheeze, physician-diagnosed asthma and allergy at follow-up, which took place an average of nine years after their first assessment.

Two-thirds of the study population who reported doing the bulk of cleaning were women, about six per cent of whom had asthma at the time of follow-up. Fewer than 10 per cent of them were full-time homemakers.

Participants were also asked to report the number of times per week they used cleaning products.

The risk of developing asthma increased with frequency of cleaning and number of different sprays used, but on average was about 30 to 50 per cent higher in people regularly exposed to cleaning sprays than in others.

Cleaning sprays such as air fresheners, furniture cleaners and glass cleaners had a particularly strong effect.

The researchers theorize that chemicals in the products trigger an inflammatory response in the lungs when the particles are inhaled. Asthma is a disease in which the airways are over sensitized and overreact to psychological or environmental triggers by becoming constricted and inflamed.

"There is a need for researchers to conduct further studies to elucidate both the extent and mechanism of the respiratory toxicity associated with such products," noted Zock.

 

 

                   

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Last modified: 07/29/08